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Liana Gergley

They say that the art of being human in this life is learning how to hold two disparate things at the same time. Loss and light. Pain and joy. Grief and celebration. Mallory, you have been my teacher in the art of being human. You taught me about being brave. You taught me about resilience. You taught me about giggling (your laugh was so contagious), and appreciating the smallest of things like Cooper rolling around in the grass and a glass of red wine as we sit outside and watch the sun set. You taught me about taking things one day at a time and the value of an unlimited Netflix account. You taught me about how to turn ordinary pool parties on Friday nights into extraordinary moments of laughter and togetherness. You taught me about the courage it takes to open yourself to the messy imperfections of a relationship and also gave me the best advice each time i was convinced that every frat boy in college was going to be my husband. You taught me that 3 shots of espresso in my almond milk latte is always better than 2 and that we are courageous and strong enough to live without certainty. You taught me about the unexpected yet perfect places where friendship happens - a beach in Cabo, a cozy couch in Pittsburgh, the kitchen table at your house on El Camino. You taught me that being a friend means saying both “i’m right here,” “i love you” and “can you please pass the fries.” You taught me about being curious and probing about this planet and why it works the way it does. You taught me that the perfect Saturday afternoon requires nothing more than Acai bowls, getting massages and laughing at a rom com until our stomachs hurt. You taught me that there is no moment we cannot endure and no feeling we can’t walk through. Mallory, today I am celebrating your glorious existence and saying thank you for all the things that you have taught me. More than anything else, you taught me about being human - about letting our hearts be big enough and spacious enough to hold all the textures of this life. Today I am here with so many people who adore you and I am filled with joy for having laughed with you, spent time with you and been human with you. I am forever grateful to you for showing me how to live. I love you forever, I will miss you deeply and and when I find myself taking a deep breath on a sunny day I will look up at the sky and smile, knowing “that’s what Mal would do.”


About

The diaries of Mallory Smith, a remarkable young woman who was determined to live a meaningful and happy life despite her struggle with cystic fibrosis and a rare superbug—from age fifteen to her death at the age of twenty-five.

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